Home ] Terms and Conditions ] Contact Us, Prices ] FAQ ] Clients ]

1940's House page 2

Home ] Yorkshire ] North Yorkshire ] East Yorkshire ] South Yorkshire ] West Yorkshire ] History ]


  
bensons cuddly toys logo and advertising tin cans to teddy bears kindle book cover a bensons teddy bear
read more about the Teddy Bear story here >>

Search our E-Commerce Archive to purchase photos

Bookmark and Share follow us on twitter

Home
Up one level

 

 

Visit our E-Commerce site to purchase photos>>

 


Romans
Anglo Normans
Knights and Castles
19th Foot Regiment
Battle of the Standard
English Civil War (2)
68th Foot Regiment DLI
47th Foot Regiment
Boer War
World War 1
World War 1 images
World War 2
1940's House page 1
1940's House page 2
World War 2 Photos page 1
World War 2 Photos page 2
World War 2 VE Day
Home Front
Bolsover Castle

World War Two 1940's House Somewhere in England

Unfortunately, the World War House has closed. It was based at Harperley in County Durham. It is no longer there.

page 2

1940

www.bbc.co.uk/history

Kitchen

1940

1940

1940

 

1940

Sifta Table Salt

1940

1940

1940

1940

1940

1940

Glace Angelica

1940

Baking Powder

1940

1940

1940

1940

1940

Hovis

Dublin Stout

1940

Lovell's Mintoes

1940

1940

National Dried Milk

1940

A posser was historically a tool used for possing or mixing laundry while hand washing it.

As hand washing has been replaced by electric & mechanical washing machines have become almost universally popular the words & implements have fallen into disuse.

Possers come in various forms, there is usually a vertical pole with a handle bar at the top but the base can be conical, with three (or more) legs or sometimes a flat disk.

Ration Book Holder

1940

1940

1940

Colman's Starch

1940

1940

Bensons Toffee De Mint

Don't Bump Luminous Black Out Badges

 

Rationing


Food, clothing, petrol, leather and other such items were rationed. Access to luxuries was severely restricted, though there was also a significant black market. Families also grew victory gardens, and small home vegetable gardens, to supply themselves with food. Many things were conserved to turn into weapons later, such as fat for nitroglycerin production.
 

Evacuation


From very early in the war it was thought that the major cities of Britain, especially London, would come under air attack, which did happen. Some children were sent to Canada. Millions of children and some mothers were evacuated from London and other major cities when the war began, but they often filtered back. When the bombing began in September 1940 they evacuated again. The discovery of the poor health and hygiene of evacuees was a shock to Britons, and helped prepare the way for the Beveridge Plan. [7] Children were only evacuated if their parents agreed but in some cases they didn't have a choice. The children were only allowed to take a few things with them including a gas mask, books, money, clothes, ration book and some small toys.

Outside

1940

1940

1940

Anderson shelter

The Anderson shelter was designed in 1938 by William Paterson and Oscar Carl (Karl) Kerrison in response to a request from the Home Office. It was named after Sir John Anderson, then Lord Privy Seal with special responsibility for preparing air-raid precautions immediately prior to the outbreak of World War II, and it was he who then initiated the development of the shelter. After evaluation by Dr David Anderson, Bertram Lawrence Hurst, and Sir Henry Jupp, of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the design was released for production.

Anderson shelters were designed to accommodate up to six people. The main principle of protection was based on curved and straight galvanised corrugated steel panels. Six curved panels were bolted together at the top, so forming the main body of the shelter, three straight sheets on either side, and two more straight panels were fixed to each end, one containing the door a total of fourteen panels. A small drainage sump was often incorporated in the floor to collect rainwater seeping into the shelter. The shelters were 6 ft (1.8 m) high, 4 ft 6 in (1.4 m) wide, and 6 ft 6 in (2 m) long. They were buried 4 ft (1.2 m) deep in the soil and then covered with a minimum of 15 in (0.4 m) of soil above the roof. The earth banks could be planted with vegetables and flowers, that at times could be quite an appealing sight and in this way would become the subject of competitions of the best-planted shelter among householders in the neighbourhood. The internal fitting out of the shelter was left to the owner and so there were wide variations in comfort.

Anderson shelters were issued free to all householders who earned less than 250 a year, and those with a higher income were charged 7. 150,000 shelters of this type were distributed from February 1939 to the outbreak of war. During the war a further 2.1 million were erected.

Because of the large number made and their robustness, many Anderson shelters still survive. Many were dug up after the war and converted into storage sheds for use in gardens and allotments.

1940

 

Home ] Up one level ] Romans ] Anglo Normans ] Knights and Castles ] 19th Foot Regiment ] Battle of the Standard ] English Civil War (2) ] 68th Foot Regiment DLI ] 47th Foot Regiment ] Boer War ] World War 1 ] World War 1 images ] World War 2 ] 1940's House page 1 ] [ 1940's House page 2 ] World War 2 Photos page 1 ] World War 2 Photos page 2 ] World War 2 VE Day ] Home Front ] Bolsover Castle ]


powered by FreeFind
 

What's new

email us at info at danum-photos dot co dot uk

Home ] Terms and Conditions ] Contact Us, Prices ] FAQ ] Clients ]

Search our E-Commerce Archive to purchase photos
View our YouTube Videos

TOP OF PAGE - site updated:29/05/2013 All Photographs on this website which are copyright Danum Photos Please read our terms and conditions